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10 June 2008 @ 10:03 pm
combusted rhetoric. How else could the 12 year No-fly Zone War have been ended?  
During the 12 year No Fly Zone war we continued to bomb Iraq's infrastructure into oblivion. Leaving Saddam Hussein in power to build palaces when he should have been repairing infrastructure and lifting up all Iraqis entailed only that the seeds for anti-American terrorism would continue to be fertilized. Pictures and video from the era speak as loudly as the insurgency inspired by prolonged destruction.

http://www.historyguy.com/no-fly_zone_war.html

The "No-Fly Zone War" pitted the air and naval forces of the United States and the United Kingdom (also referred to as "Great Britain"), against the air defenses of Iraq. This conflict proved to be largely ignored by the media and the public in both the U.S. and in the U.K., though it impacted the military and the citizens of Iraq on an almost weekly basis, especially since the intense "Desert Fox" bombing campaign of 1998. The roots of this conflict are quite simple to trace: the inconclusive and vague cease-fire agreement ending the Gulf War of 1990-1991. This agreement called on the Iraqi government to allow United Nations weapons inspectors to search for prohibited weapons in Iraq, and, perhaps more importantly, allowed the Coalition Allies (originally the U.S., the U.K. and France), to enforce what came to be called "No-Fly Zones" over northern and southern Iraq. The original intent of these zones was to protect the rebellious Iraqi minorities (Kurds and Shiite Muslims) in northern and southern Iraq, respectively. The Coalition was permitted to fly warplanes over these zones to prevent Saddam Hussein's government from using military aircraft to attack these minorities. As time progressed though, the No-Fly Zones became a means for the Allies to force Iraq to comply with UN and Coalition demands, often related to the status of the weapons inspectors. As tensions mounted after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, the possibility of a major escalation between Iraq and the U.S. increased dramatically, and the violence in the No-Fly Zone increased in preparation for the beginning of the Third Persian Gulf War: "Operation Iraqi Freedom", which began on March 19, 2003. In historical terms, the No-Fly Zone War is considered to have ended on March 19, 2003, when "Operation Iraqi Freedom" began and this conflict segued into the larger war. All three of the U.S.-led Coalition wars with Iraq (the 1990-1991 Gulf War, the 1991-2003 No-Fly Zone War, and the 2003 Gulf War 2) can really be seen as one long, extended conflict, but for classification purposes, are seen as separate conflicts. (written on March 22, 2003)

The text below shows the dates of previous updates. For now, that will remain unchanged in order to provide some historical perspective.

As of this writing (Sept. 2, 2002), tensions between the United States and Iraq are escalating, with President Bush leaning toward an invasion of Iraq with the goal of toppling the dictatorship of Saddam Hussein.  Such a war would be part of the American War on Terrorism sparked by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.  The Bush Administration explains its apprehension with Iraq with two specific concerns.  First, it accuses Iraq of not honoring the 1991 cease-fire agreement of 1991 by no longer allowing United Nations weapons inspectors to search for weapons of mass destruction (WOMD).  Examples of WOMDs include biological and chemical weapons, as well as nuclear arms.  In 1998, Iraq barred the UN inspectors from the country, prompting American and British air strikes (see “Operation Desert Fox” below).  Since then, no inspectors have been allowed back in.  The Bush Administration is convinced that the Saddam government is building WOMDs and would be willing to use them on the United States, and America’s allies in the Middle East, including Israel and Saudi Arabia.  The second concern revolves around Iraqi support for international terrorism.  While a long-time supporter of Palestinian efforts to fight Israel, the allegation that the September 11 terrorists may have enjoyed Iraqi support could be a determining factor in a future invasion of Iraq by the U.S.  In late summer, 2002, members of the U.S. administration were publicly discussing and justifying a possible future pre-emptive attack, while members of the U.S. Congress and the media are asking for more information.  Most traditional American allies around the world are also expressing doubts as to the wisdom or the need to invade Iraq.  Meanwhile, American and British air strikes on Iraqi targets in the “No-Fly Zones” accelerated.  In the week preceding Sept. 2, 2002, Coalition forces (U.S. and British forces) conducted six air strikes on Iraqi targets, with the ostensible justification that the targets posed a threat to the air patrols in the No-Fly Zones over northern and southern Iraq (see Washington Post article on the latest attacks).  This conflict could soon escalate into a major war.

Since American and British forces carried out
During the 12 year No Fly Zone war we continued to bomb Iraq's infrastructure into oblivion. Leaving Saddam Hussein in power to build palaces when he should have been repairing infrastructure and lifting up all Iraqis entailed only that the seeds for anti-American terrorism would continue to be fertilized.

Operation Desert Fox in December 1998 against Iraq, this "forgotten" war in the Middle East has only become more intense. According to the New York Times in an
article on August 13, 1999, American and British forces have escalated the continuing war against Saddam Hussein and Iraq. Since the beginning of 1999 through August 1999, Allied pilots launched over 1,100 missiles against 359 Iraqi targets. That number equals nearly three times the amount of ordnance used in the four-day Desert Fox strike. Also, the pilots in the Iraq War have flown two-thirds the number of missions as NATO pilots in the 1999 Kosovo War. By all accounts, Iraqi forces continue to target their radar and fire missiles at Allied warplanes despite the punishment inflicted from the air. The estimated, unofficial cost of this war to U.S. and British taxpayers is around $1 billion per year.

 
 
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